Japanese Black Trifele Tomato

Japanese Black Trifele Seeds


Japanese Black Trifele Tomato



The Japanese Black Trifele actually originates from Mother Russia. The original name was Yaponskiy Trufel Chernyi, but when American seed companies began importing them in the early 20th Century, a mistranslation led it to be called Japanese instead of Yaponsky and it has ever since been known as Japanese Black Trifele.

This Russian heirloom offers a pleasant rich taste, spicy richness, not an overly sweet flavor. The tomatoes are pear shaped and are a mottled purple color with green streaked shoulders, it darkens to a burnt chocolate color and culminates in an almost completely black base. Harvest when the shoulders are still green for the *best taste.

The Black Trifele Tomatoes are pretty much blemish free and crack resistant but are subject to any other blights that effect other tomatoes.




Unlike many Russian varieties, this cultivar will perform well in hot weather and will tolerate cool weather as well. They ain't gonna grow outdoors in Alaska next Christmas, but Northern gardeners as well as Southerners can get a good yield out of them.

Start seeds indoors 6 - 8 weeks before planting outdoors.

Germination 7 - 14 Days

Full Sun

70-80 days to Maturity

Indeterminate.

Fruit Weight 4-6 oz

Plant Height - 3 to 4 Ft

Spacing - 24 -36 Inches

Soil ph: 6.0 -6.8

Yield - Well Above Average

*Note - In the Taste Department - with this particular cultivar there is a very fine line between ripe and over-ripe, once you cross that line you'll have a very poor taste experience so far as fresh tomatoes go.

With most tomato cultivars, the fruit concentrates its sugars as it ripens. In the case of this particular cultivar, as it is more spicy than sweet - it does not concentrate much sugar but rather accumulates and concentrates the compounds which give it its spicy quality - in excess. As it over-ripens it tastes simply awful as a fresh tomato. Cooked, it is still very good for sauces as the unpleasant tasting compounds will be cooked away.



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